Category Archives: Food

Daniel’s guide to fish – his favourite subject in the kitchen

Vineyard 64 914 x 437 Daniel’s guide to fish – his favourite subject in the kitchenThe topic of fish and shellfish is almost as vast as the sea itself and one that I have a particular love for. It’s my favourite subject and section in the kitchen.

Pan fried sea bass spaghetti roll 150x150 Daniel’s guide to fish – his favourite subject in the kitchenWhen I was younger I remember local fisherman coming to the door every morning with a massive quantity of fish, the quality of which was unbelievable. One of the most popular was sea bass, a very meaty fish with firm flesh, which is equally delicious whether grilled, pan-fried, braised or baked. Versatility and tasty, they are available all year round, although it’s best to avoid them in March to June when they are spawning. Other favourites were sardines, nutritious oily fish, which will grilled or barbequed whole, or made in bouillabaisse and ling, which are perfect for fish pie. These days they are much in demand and therefore over fished, so I only buy them if they are line caught and have them occasionally as a treat.

The sustainability of fish is a big issue these days and one that we need to consider. At   TheScallops 150x150 Daniel’s guide to fish – his favourite subject in the kitchen Vineyard, we try to make sure we buy from a sustainable source. It is very important that we find the right suppliers who will provide us with the best possible fish that is also sourced from sustainable stocks. It is all too easy to forget that most species are over fished, and therefore becoming not only expensive, but increasingly rare. So, for, example, we buy hand-dived scallops, not dredged ones, line-caught not net-caught fish, and farmed, but organically reared fish, where possible.

We currently have hand-dived scallops on the menu served with vegetables “à la grecque” and walnuts, and also many other fish dishes;  fillet of Cornish cod, Heirloom tomato, ratte potato, chive, fillet of Scottish salmon, aubergine, kumquat, lime  and South Coast turbot, girolles, rocket, chicken jus. View our current menu. Our food and wine matching dinners are also proving popular and I have included a particularly lovely turbot dish on the Clarendelle dinner menu on 25th September. Discover more about this dinner

I can’t stress how necessary it is to buy fresh, quality produce from a good source. A fish should be firm to the touch and its skin and eyes should look bright – dullness or discolouration denote it is past its best. And smell it – a fresh fish has clean, not overly ‘fishy’ odour, and sea fish often smell slightly salted or like seaweed. Lobsters and crabs should look undamaged and feel heavy for their size, while shellfish should have tightly closed shells.

Daniel Galmiche

Where would we be without herbs?

herb image Where would we be without herbs?By Daniel Galmiche

I cannot remember a day when there were no herbs in my home or my kitchen, and if such an instance we ever to happen, it would purely be by accident. Would I be able to cook without them? Yes, because I love my trade. Would I like it? Probably not.

It’s very hard to explain how essential herbs are to the cooking process or how profoundly they enhance food, whether added to a salad, meat, fish, vegetables or even a dessert. They have such an important place in the kitchen simply because they bring so much taste, so much scent, so much colour to a dish.

Like everyone, I have a few favourite herbs that I often use. One of them is thyme; one of the most versatile and commonly used herbs in the kitchen. It is especially good with meats such as pork, lamb and mutton because it aids the digestion of fats, and it’s also used in stuffing, ragout, and the all-essential bouquet garni- my standard bouquet garni is made up of a sprig of thyme, a sprig of parsley and a bay leaf.

Another herb I like to use is lavender. Many people do not associate lavender with cooking and are surprised to find it in food, but it is a versatile culinary herb. It is great in meat and poultry dishes as well as desserts. We use it in our specialities at The Vineyard. For example, lavender infused in honey and chilli gives a wonderful flavour to fish dishes.

My favourite herb to cook with is rosemary. Whilst it’s difficult to explain why I love it so much, I suspect it is partly because it is so evocative of my childhood, reminding me of when I would cut it freshly from our garden at home to go in whatever dish Maman was preparing that day.

When mixed with other ingredients, rosemary changes character. It is a great herb, but it’s strength can be lethal, and adding too much of it can make a dish taste bitter. Using rosemary carefully is therefore crucial – but when you succeed, you have a heavenly scent.

Growing a variety of herbs in your very own herb garden, whether in your kitchen or on a balcony, a roof terrace or window sill, is a great idea, especially if you cook a lot. Not only does this allow you to control the quality of herbs you use in your cooking, but it also means you regularly get to use fresh herbs whose flavour is completely different from and far superior to the flavour of shop bought dried herbs.

Mushroom Foraging Tips from Daniel Galmiche

Mushrooms image Mushroom Foraging Tips from Daniel GalmicheWhat you need to know before you go foraging for mushrooms
Before you start to forage for mushrooms you must learn about them as collecting and easting the wrong mushrooms can make you very sick or even kill you. At first go foraging with someone who knows what is edible and what is not. Once you have some experience, you can go on your own, but you should still take a good field guide with you, and always check you’ve picked an edible variety. Prepare the wild mushrooms and wash them well. Slugs, snails and other unwanted inhabitants love them too!

Trompettes de la mort
Generally, trompettes de la mort are common woodland mushrooms resembling black funnels. They are slightly tough in texture and often chopped and added to a sauce or mixed with other mushrooms. They can also be dried. I like these mushrooms for their very earthy flavour.

Girolles or chanterelles
These are funnel shaped and found mainly in hardwood and coniferous forests, especially in older, moss-rich forests, and they are usually picked between June and October. They are an orange yellow colour with a delicate stalk. With their nutty flavour, they are beautiful when pan-fried with herbs and served with pasta.

Ceps
There’s nothing more satisfying than collecting mushrooms, bringing them home and cooking them. I particularly like ceps (called porcini in Italian) with their large, bulbous stalks. They are best eaten young, and are delicious cooked in omelettes or velouté sauces. There are plenty of ceps in Britain – for example, in the New Forest – but they can also be found dried or in jars in oil.

Field and morel mushrooms
There are hundreds of common mushrooms such as button and brown mushrooms, but some of the tastiest include field and morel mushrooms. Field mushrooms are found in summer and autumn in rich, open, manured grasslands grazed by horses or cows, and are white to pinkish grey with a white stem. These were my Maman’s favourite and when I was younger we used to get up at dawn to collect them. They are delicious sautéed in butter and herbs.

Found in springtime, morels are very tasty. Their conical shape has a delightful honeycomb pattern and they have a delicate scent. I like them best cooked with a touch of cream and chopped chives. You can find morels in supermarkets and delicatessens.

Wild mushrooms are readily available during their seasons, and if you don’t pick them yourself you can find them in good supermarkets. They are usually dried in delicatessens and supermarkets all round. The flavour, texture and scent of wild mushrooms are very distinct; cultivated mushrooms are widely available but no match for unique appeal of their wild cousins!

Chef’s Table – a totally unique and exclusive dining experience

DG on the pass with Slow cooked fillet of Scottish beef 529KB Chef’s Table – a totally unique and exclusive dining experienceThe Chef’s Table at The Vineyard is fantastic for larger groups as it allows everyone to see behind the scenes in the kitchen throughout lunch or dinner from preparation right through to dessert. So whether you’re looking for an exciting way to end a productive meeting, celebrating a birthday or another special occasion, the Chef’s Table is the perfect way to entertain and indulge in food and wine pairing at it’s best.

With fixed cameras fitted to the most interesting areas of the kitchen, guests will be able to watch the chefs in action on large television screens from the comfort of their own seat.

Vineyard 66 150x150 Chef’s Table – a totally unique and exclusive dining experienceA select number of guests will be lucky enough to get an insight into the workings of a hotel kitchen by joining our Executive Head Chef, Daniel Galmiche and his team throughout the dinner to put the finishing touches to each of the dishes before they are served. Kitchen tours for the whole group can also be arranged so that everyone has a chance to see behind the scenes.

Vineyard 69 150x150 Chef’s Table – a totally unique and exclusive dining experienceYou’ll be treated to a Champagne reception on arrival followed by a seven course tasting menu cooked by Daniel and his team with matching wines for each course chosen by our sommelier team. With over 30,000 bottles in our cellar and 3,000 bins, we have wines to suit every food, mood and palate. Take a peek at our menu that past Chef’s Table parties have enjoyed:

Cream of asparagus velouté, white balsamic gel
Guinea fowl and parsley terrine, orange, chicory, almonds
Lyme Bay monkfish, green and white asparagus, fennel
South Coast turbot, girolles, rocket, chicken jus
Corn fed Tidenham duck breast, spring carrot, wild rice
White chocolate and passion fruit terrine, exotic purée, coconut
English rhubarb savarin, poached in thyme, hazelnut cream

Daniel Galmiche photo 150x150 Chef’s Table – a totally unique and exclusive dining experienceEach guest will receive a signed menu by Daniel Galmiche at the end of the evening to take home as a souvenir of the unique culinary experience. The price per person is £220 per person based on a minimum of 50 people.

Daniel comments on the Chef’s Table: “I really enjoy meeting the guests and inviting them into my kitchen to see all the amazing seasonal produce we use. Being a sustainable restaurant, we only use produce in season sourced as locally as possible. ”

If you are interested in discovering more about our Chef’s Table experience, please don’t hesitate to give our events team a call on 01635 589407 or email events1@the-vineyard.co.uk

For more details on other food and wine experience we can offer, please visit our website

Daniel’s Deconstructed Poached Rhubarb and Pistachio Crumble

s new book Daniels Deconstructed Poached Rhubarb and Pistachio Crumble

I’m very excited to tell you that my new book, Revolutionary French Cooking, launched on Thursday 1st May. This is just one of my recipes that’s great to try now. I hope you enjoy!

This is a very different type of crumble from the one your grandmother used to make, as the rhubarb is gently poached in a lemon-grass-infused syrup and then elegantly layered in a glass with a lemon and lime cream and topped with a crispy pistachio crumble. It makes a deliciously elegant and modern twist on an old favourite.

Serves 4

Preparation time – 20 minutes, plus at least 3 hours chilling

Cooking time – 50 minutes

400g/140z rhubarb, peeled, peelings reserved, cut in 2.5cm/1 in long pieces
100g/3 ½ /scant ½ cup caster sugar
1 lemongrass stalk, split and bruised

For the lemon and lime cream
185ml/6floz/¾ cup double cream
2 tbsp. caster sugar
2 tbsp. lemon juice
Finely grated zest of ½ lemon
Finely grated zest of ½ lime

For the pistachio crumble
100g/ 3 ½ oz/heaped ¾ cup icing sugar
100g/ 3 ½ oz/heaped ¾ cup plain flour
A pinch of salt
75g/ 2 ½oz /¾cup ground almonds
40g/1 ½ oz/scant ⅓ cup shelled pistachios, roughly chopped
100g/3 ½ oz unsalted butter, softened

 1 To make the lemon and lime cream, put the cream and sugar in a small saucepan over a high heat and bring to the boil. Put the lemon juice and both zests in a small jug and as soon as the cream comes to the boil, pour it into the jug and mix quickly to combine. Pour the hot cream mixture into four sundae glasses, leave to cool, then chill in the fridge for at least three hours.

 2 Put the rhubarb, rhubarb peelings, sugar and lemongrass in a sauté pan and just cover with water. Heat over a low heat until simmering, then cook for 15-20 minutes until the rhubarb is just tender but keeps its shape. Strain through a fine sieve into the cleaned pan, then return the syrup to the heat and cook until it has reduced by half and is thick and syrupy. Meanwhile, discard the rhubarb peelings and the lemongrass and put the rhubarb in a shallow non-metallic dish. Pour the reduced syrup over the top of the rhubarb and leave to cool while you make the crumble.

3 Preheat the oven to 160 °C/315 °F/gas 2 ½. Put all the crumble ingredients into a large mixing bowl and rub gently with your fingertips to make a coarse crumb mixture. Tip into a baking tray in an even layer and bake for 20-25 minutes until golden brown. Turn the crumble mixture, bringing the edges into the centre and spreading it out into an even layer again every 6-8 minutes to make sure it cooks evenly. Remove from the oven and leave to cool completely until crunchy.

4 Take the cream-filled glasses out of the fridge and top with the rhubarb. Drizzle with the syrup and finish with the crumble, gently sprinkling it over the top. Serve immediately while the crumble is still crunchy.

 Happy Cooking!

To view this recipe and other from my new book, Revolutionary French Cooking, buy your own copy from Amazon

Daniel Galmiche

 

Roast Lamb with Mediterranean Vegetables & Sauce Vierge

meat lamb FrenchBrasserie DuncanBaird YukiSugiura Roast Lamb with Mediterranean Vegetables & Sauce Vierge

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A dish from my cookbook, French Brasserie Cookbook:

It’s funny the things that get us excited. For me it is the seasons – not just the colours and the smellsm but knowing the soon certain produce is going to be available that hasn’t been around for a while. When spring arrives, it is wold garlic first, then peas and, at last, the new season’s spring lamb; milk-fed and unbelievably tender. Simply pan-roasted and served with courgettes, tomatoes and sauce vierge, this dish brings out all the freshness and colour of the Mediterranean. Enjoy it with a light rosé wine, close your eyes and there you are – in Provence.

Ingredients:

2 lamb tenderloins, fully trimmed
4 rosemary sprigs
2 tbsp olive oil
4 garlic cloves, unpeeled
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
1 recipe quantity Sauce Vierge (see below)

Mediterranean Vegetables
4-6 tbsp olive oil
2 plum tomatoes, cut into 1/4″ thick slices
2 small zucchini, cut into 1/4″ thick slices
1 eggplant, cut into 1/4″ thick slices

Sauce Vierge
4 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
1 shallot, chopped
1 tomato, seeded and diced
Juice of 1/2 lime
1 tbsp balsamic vinegar
1 handful of flat-leaf parsley, finely chopped
Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

Instructions:

Step 1: Heat the oven to 425°F.

Step 2: Season the lamb with salt and pepper, pierce each tenderloin on both sides with a sharp knife and insert a rosemary sprig into each opening.

Step 3: Heat a skillet with an ovenproof handle over medium heat and add the oil and garlic. Add the lamb and cook about 5 minutes, turning continuously, until sealed and golden brown all over. Transfer the skillet to the oven for 5-8 minutes. Remove the skillet from the oven, set aside and keep the lamb warm.

Step 4: Meanwhile, cook the vegetables. Heat another skillet over medium heat and add the oil. Add the vegetables in batches so they are in a single layer, season with salt and pepper and fry 3-4 minutes on each side until just tender and golden.

Step 5: Starting with the tomatoes, arrange 3 slices of tomato and 2 slices of zucchini and eggplant, alternately and just overlapping, in the middle of each of four plates.

Step 6: Carve the lamb into thick slices on the diagonal and arrange on top of the vegetables. Spoon the Sauce Vierge (see below) over the lamb and around the plates and serve.

Sauce Vierge

Step 1: Put the oil in a small saucepan and briefly warm it over low heat about 30 seconds. Add the shallot and cook 2 minutes.

Step 2: Remove the pan from the heat and stir in the tomato, lime juice and balsamic vinegar. Just before serving, add the parsley and season with salt and pepper. Enjoy warm drizzled over roast lamb.

Happy Cooking!

Daniel Galmiche

 

Chocolate and Wine – A Delicate Pairing

WineChoc email Chocolate and Wine   A Delicate PairingWe thought you might like to discover more about some of the wines that were tasted at our wine and chocolate hedonism masterclass on Wednesday evening. Wine and chocolate can be a tricky pairing so it’s worth remembering to avoid Sauvignon Blanc, Riesling and other high acid or drying whites. And for red wines, again avoid acidic grapes or cooler regions like Pinot Noir and Gamay or drying reds with bitter or dry tannins, like Nebbiolo and Sangiovese.

Why not join our Chocolate and Wine Matching Dinner on Friday 25th April and discover even more about this delicate pairing?

Schramsberg Blanc de Noir, Calistoga, California 2008

Schramsberg’s best selling wine is almost 100% Pinot Noir and consistently out classes Champagne in blind tastings around the world. Full bodied with rich toasty brioche notes and firm acidity. Our favourite fizz at the moment who’s quality has been consistent since its first vintage in 1965. It has lively aromas of apricot and persimmon, which gracefully lead to nuances of honey and lemon. The fruitful nose is complemented by vanilla spice and candied almond. The palate offers crisp and tart flavors of orange and lime rind, supported by a touch of roasted coffee. The finish is long and lingering

£25.26 per bottle – buy online


Juan Gil Monastrell 4, Jumilla, Spain 2012

A hugely intense nose with fresh juicy blackberry and plum fruit, delicate vanilla spice and cedar. The palate mirrors the nose with layers of lush spicy plum and cherry fruit, more sweet spice, minerality and gentle tannins to the finish.

£8.05 per bottle – buy online


Ferrari-Carano Black Muscat Eldorado Noir, Sonoma, California 2010

Luscious, mouth watering black Muscat with just enough acidity to keep each mouthful crisp and refreshing. Black Muscat is a very popular style in California and we are delighted to represent this one.

£22 per half bottle  – buy online


Holden Manz Good sPort, Franschoek, South Africa 2009

Smooth, soft entry with rich vanilla, coconut and raisin fruit exudes on the palate. This wine is rich and warm and has a long finish. With time, the balance between spirit and wine will harmonise creating a wonderfully complex offering.

£27.50 per bottle – buy online

 

Wild Garlic is in season

tumblr mjpph4VFAL1rveocqo1 1280 Wild Garlic is in season

I love this time of year when wild garlic is in season. The white flowers are really pretty and I love the soft garlicky flavour they produce when cooked; it’s not as strong as the everyday garlic you’ll find in supermarkets. The flowers are not only fantastic with salmon and lamb, but are also great in salads. You can also eat the leaves and the stem, both of which can be used in cooking.

Found near streams, wetland areas, in nature reserves and also funnily enough you will find it growing in woodland areas amongst bluebells. It’s great to be able to walk through the woods and smell the wild garlic.

There’s so much that goes well with wild garlic, but my particular favourites are cooking up a garlic veloute and a small parmesan espuma, parfait! Look out for wild garlic infused dishes at The Vineyard soon.

I’d love to hear all about what your wild garlic recipes so please message me on Twitter @danielgalmiche.

Enjoy the rest of your weekend.

Daniel Galmiche

Executive Chef at The Vineyard

Why I Love Truffles

tumblr mgtrskVeMn1rveocqo1 1280 Why I Love Truffles

Daniel Galmiche, Executive Chef at The Vineyard

I really like the month of January, not only because of the snow fall, as it often does in winter in Franche-Comte (next to Switzerland), where I come from, but also for the truffle, this famous beautiful pungent fungus, which I love. It is this time of the year where we can have fun creating a truffle menu, which you can come to enjoy on Saturday 9th February.

So what type of truffle we will use? Well, we would love to use the white, but the season for this type is over. They are also the most expensive coming from Northern Italy, in the region of the Piedmont from a town called Alba. They have a massive scent, and are often sliced raw on top of risotto for example. But they are also used in plenty of other dishes in the season from October to December.

For Saturday’s menu we will use the black Périgord truffle from South West France. They have the best flavour really; we call them the diamond of the kitchen. They can also be found in Spain, Italy, Croatia, Slovakia, and Serbia.

If you want to wait for cheaper truffles, which are also very good, look out for them next summer or autumn. They are black outside, beige with white vein inside and generally come from Burgundy, but can be found in other countries like Spain, Croatia, Portugal, and Britain. They are difficult to get hold of really unless you do happen to know a forager. However, supermarkets will sell them in a small jar, in brine of some sort, with one or two truffles in it.

Nothing can beat a fresh truffle though, so why not try my guinea fowl recipe in my French Brasserie Cookbook, great to have as a special treat with friends or family. Like I show in the recipe, black truffle can be cooked, unlike the white ones, which are used raw. You can also slice them very fine on top of food on a truffle potato salad for example.

So until next time, have fun cooking!

 

Daniel Galmiche

Always mix business with pleasure

If being locked in a hotel conference room in the city for 8 hours isn’t your idea of getting a fresh perspective, we’d be delighted to offer something a little different. We offer plenty of “Only at The Vineyard” activities to inspire and motivate.

The wine discovery experiences are always popular:

  • Aromatic Grapes – enjoy tasting wines made from aromatic grapes such as Sauvignon Blanc, Riesling, Pinot Noir and Shiraz
  • The Art of Wine Tasting – learn how to taste wine from the experts
  • Old World vs New World – which will be your favourite style of wine?
  • Discovery – excite your taste buds with rare and intriguing wines
  • Blind Tasting – an equal number of French and American wines to try. Will you guess correctly?

Other activities that are equally fun to try:

If you’d like to discover more about how we can help to make your meeting memorable, call our events team on 01635 528770 or email Poppy – events1@the-vineyard.co.uk